Constructing Ambiguity Read Text
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To a passenger travelling on the Dublin to Belfast, or Belfast to Dublin train, the Irish border is barely visible. But this ambiguous border is at the centre of a political debate; one which could see these landscapes – and the lives of those who live in them – change completely. “Constructive ambiguity” is a term generally credited to Henry Kissinger. It refers to the deliberate use of ambiguity in order to advance a political purpose. It is said that this tactic played a major role in facilitating the progress of the peace process in Northern Ireland, others have referred to it as ‘cooking the fudge’, leaving much unresolved. Since September 2017 a group of architecture students from Cardiff University, led by Michael Corr and Tom Keeley, have been reflecting upon and investigating what this term might for architecture, the border, and Ireland, now.

Year
2018
Type
Print
Location
Dublin
Collaborators